Posts Tagged ‘flipped classroom’

INDT 501-02 Blog 6: To Flip or not to Flip?

Sunday, February 24th, 2013

flippedclassroom

To be completely honest, I don’t really know how I feel about a flipped classroom.  To me, it definitely has its pros and cons.  I think it’s a good way to make a classroom more student-centered and to focus on what the student doesn’t understand.  However, I think we would like to believe that everyone in this day and age has access to internet and a computer, but that’s not the case.  I can’t see a flipped classroom being implemented in lower income areas, where it could be most beneficial.  It just seems to me students won’t be a receptive to an online lecture the night before a class.  Especially since most students dread having homework, and then on top of it they would have to watch a lecture or do an online lesson?

I like parts of the flipped classroom but I don’t think I would ever fully “flip” my classroom. I would want to take aspects of the flipped classroom, such as having a mini video or small online reading or research to do for homework to prepare them for the next day, but I would want to review the video or reading the next day in class to make sure that the students understand what they had watched.  I also like the idea of how the flipped classroom got started.  I would love to be able to video my class discussions and lectures so students who are absent, or even students who did not take notes, or who did not understand the lesson fully could look back on the video to see what I had discussed in class that day.

I don’t think this is the best pedagogy.  It cuts down on the actual face time with students and becomes impersonal.  It would be hard to really see how students learn if you are only spending time with them to help with homework.  What if the students aren’t learning this way? And instead of a flipped classroom improving passing rates, it hurts them? Then the school system is back to where it started and would have to go through another “flip”.  I think it would be best to only use this method in certain classes, with older children.  Perhaps a high school science class could watch a video about a dissection they will be doing the next day in class.  Or a history class watches a lecture on the civil rights era and does their homework in response to the video.